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Magna Alert

Our Science Centre is closed from Fri 30th Nov for maintenance and to renew some of our exhibition areas. We will be reopening Tues 8th Jan 2019. Many thanks for your support.

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Through until the 1800s when the collection of census and map data makes tracking development more straightforward, surviving records for the area are sparse, but reveal some interesting stories.

Between 1066 and 1086 the Domesday Book records the steep decline in the local economy caused by the 'Harrying of the North'. Settlements, buildings and crops are destroyed as William the Conqueror puts down any further hope of rebellion. Lordship of the lands passes to the Normans.

Sometime after 1147 the Monks of Roche Abbey had holdings at Templeborough. Evidence suggests water was diverted using cuttings and it is likely the monks are operating mills by the river. 

Following the Dissolution of the Monasteries, in 1538 use of the land at Templeborough passes back to the Reresby family. By 1560 Lionel Reresby pays the Crown (then Queen Elizabeth 1) an annual rent of “13s and 4d for all services and demands”, including two water driven mills.

The Reresby family have a long association with the Ickles and surrounding area. Sometime during the reign of Henry III, they became lords of the manor by marriage into the de Normanville family. Ruling Rotherham from Thrybergh to Brinsworth, the lands around here were used for rearing horses. Ickles Hall (see top image) was rebuilt several times over a 700 year period borrowing stone from the Roman fort. It was finally demolished in the 1930s to make way for the expansion of the steelworks.

In 1663 on learning about the legend of treasure buried during the Civil War, Sir John Reresby headed to London. Along with a friend he set about searching for an old soldier in Cromwell's army. Alas they got into a quarrel and then a fight, which wounded them both and left their attacker almost dead. Seized by the mob they were held prisoner. Fined £50 by the magistrate they returned empty handed, and never found any treasure!

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